Posts made in September 2019

Dr. Jean Baderschneider

A Global Strategy to End Modern Slavery: Interview with Dr. Jean Baderschneider

Our expert is Dr. Jean Baderschneider, CEO and founding board member of the Global Fund to End Modern Slavery. This organization is designed to catalyze a global strategy to end human trafficking and to increase the necessary resources from the public and private sector to fund it. Baderschneider was in the private sector for 35 years, coming from ExxonMobil as Vice President, of Global Procurement. She also has over 10 years of anti-trafficking experience and has served on the Board of a number of the key anti-trafficking organizations in the field.

 

Interview with Dr. Baderschneider

 

Editor: Give us some background on the scope of the human trafficking problem.

 

Baderschneider: The first thing to understand is that it is a big problem, and it’s everywhere, including in our own back yard. According to the Global Slavery Index, an estimated 40 million people are in some form of modern slavery. We are working to create better quantitative data tofully grasp the breadth and depth of human slavery.

 

Editor: Why has it become such an issue right now?

 

Baderschneider: Trafficking is extraordinarily profitable. According to a 2012 estimate, thiscrime generates at least a $150 billion a year in profits for traffickers, second only to drug trafficking. The combination of the number of people exploited and size of the profits has raised demand for action. The increasing number of focused awareness efforts, as well as new legislative, efforts such as the Modern Slavery Act are having an impact and creating platforms for action.

 

Editor: And other global trends that lead to more trafficking?

 

Baderschneider: Human trafficking sits at the intersection of many global trends, such as migration, organized crime, global supply chains, and so on.. Many people migrate because they have no other options and are looking for work. There are approximately 244 million migrants a year.While this can be a positive experience for some, it also results in large numbers of vulnerable people at risk of ending up in exploitative labor situations.

 

Editor: What are the obstacles that keep us from successfully combating it so far?

 

Baderschneider: The existing efforts and resources do not match the scale of the problem. The resources currently available to combat trafficking are in the hundreds of millions of dollars, but as I said, the traffickers are making $150 billion a year. That’s not a fair fight. In addition, efforts have been fragmented, uncoordinated, and limited by lack of data.

 

Also, you may be able to shut down trafficking in one place, but the traffickers immediately pop up someplace else, like a neighboring village. Instead of solving the problem, it has only been displaced.

 

Editor: How is the organization you head, the Global Fund to End Modern Slavery, addressing the problem?

 

Baderschneider: Here’s our  three-pronged approach.

  • First, we have programs related to rule of law, designed to end impunity for all forms of trafficking.
  • Second, we have programs focused on sustaining freedom for survivors through recovery, reintegration and economic opportunity.
  • Third, we have programs focused on business engagement, including proactively engaging with the business community and its supply chains.

In the world today, there is about $70 trillion in procurement spending. If we can get corporations fully engaged and leverage their resources, it begins to become more of a fair fight. We want investors and banks to incentivize companies to meaningfully address the risk of slavery in their supply chains.

Editor: I would imagine that shining a light on a company’s slave-labor-fueled supply chain would be a powerful tool. No  company wants the reputational catastrophe of being outed for using slave labor in its supply chain.  Do you have a final thought for us?

Baderschneider: Yes, we are doing much more than there’s space for in your blog! Come to our website to see what else we’re doing. https://www.gfems.org

 

Mitzi Perdue is the organizer of the Global Anti-Trafficking Auction, and author of the book, 52 Tips for Combatting Human Trafficking, available on Amazon.

Rachel Lloyd

 Recovery, Dignity, and Helping Others after Being Trafficked

 Recovery, Dignity, and Helping Others after Being Trafficked

By Mitzi Perdue

 

If you were to meet Rachel Lloyd today, you’d see a leader known for improving the lives of young women who have been sex trafficked. The organization she founded, Girls Educational and Mentoring Services (GEMS), has helped thousands of girls and young women be restored to a life of dignity.

We’ll get into how this miracle gets accomplished in a moment. But first let’s take a look at Lloyd’s extraordinary journey from being trafficked herself to leading a movement that has transformed laws, attitudes and most of all, lives.

When Lloyd was 17, she left England and her abusive, alcoholic mother, hoping to start a new life in Germany. She arrived in Munich with enough money to pay for two weeks’ room and board. She assumed she could get a job waitressing.

However, there was a flaw with this plan. “I didn’t speak German,” she recalls, “and that meant I couldn’t get the kind of job I was counting on.”

At the end of two weeks, things were becoming desperate.  “I was about to be kicked out of my bed and breakfast, and that meant I’d have no place to go. I walked into a strip club and said I could dance. My plan was to do it to do it for a week, so I’d have enough money to pay for a ticket back to England.”

However, she wasn’t even qualified for a job dancing. The manager did offer to pay her to be a hostess, the kind that encourages customers to have a drink with them.

She soon learned that having a drink with a customer wasn’t just “having a drink with a customer.” There was a back room where the high paying customers expected her to spend intimate time with them.

Her first night, an 80-year old man bought her a bottle of champagne. In return, she had to go the back room with him.  

After her “back room” experience was over,  she felt so dirty that she spent the rest of that night in the shower, “wanting to scrub my skin off.” The experience was harrowing, but it did mean that she had enough money pay her rent. 

Her plans to work at the strip club for only a week, didn’t work out.  The money was good, but her self-esteem was low, and it wasn’t much of a step to being sex trafficked. 

Her life became full of beatings, hunger, betrayal, violence, and terror. It was a nightmare.

 

After two years, she was able to get out of “the life,” with the help of a military family and a church on a US Air Force base in Germany. From there, she emigrated to the United States, got her GED, a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s in Applied Urban Anthropology.

Her time of being exploited for commercial sex left her with a deep desire to help other young women.  She started GEMS in 1998, and in the years since, she’s helped mentor more than 300 girls and young women a year, helping them get out of “the life.”   In the last 21 years, she’s:

  • Created a place of safety and support for thousands of girls and young women 
  • Passed legislation that finally protects children 
  • Reached millions of Americans through awareness and cultural change efforts 
  • Created the survivor leadership movement 
  • Permanently changed the conversation and landscape on CSE (Commercial Sexual Exploitation) and domestic trafficking in the U.S. 

She sums up her life by saying, “Obviously there have been experiences I would rather not have had and pain I wish I hadn’t felt, but every experience, every tear, every hardship has equipped me for the work I do now. I get such deep satisfaction from knowing I’m fulfilling my purpose, that my life is counting for something; it puts all the past hurts into perspective. My pain has become my passion and I find true joy in my work, in my life, and in seeing ‘my girls’ fulfill their purpose too.” 

If you’d like to support girls and young women who are working to rebuild their lives after having been trafficked, visit Lloyd’s website: https://www.gems-girls.org/about-anything  And even better, donate.  Your donation can make an extraordinary difference in the lives of the many young women whose lives GEMS and Rachel Lloyd touch.

Mitzi Perdue is a business owner, speaker, and author of the books, HOW TO MAKE YOUR FAMILY BUSINESS LAST, and also 52 TIPS FOR PREVENTING HUMAN TRAFFICKING. Contact her at Mitzi@MitziPerdue.com or call her at (410) 860-4444 for more info about human trafficking education.

Dr. Ma

Prosecution of Trafficking in Taiwan

Prosecution of Trafficking in Taiwan: Why the Country Is a Standout

 By Mitzi Perdue

The U.S. State Department’s Trafficking in Persons report ranks countries according to how effectively they are combatting human trafficking.  The rankings range from:

Tier One, countries that are working hard and effectively to acknowledge and combat human trafficking

Tier Two, countries that are making significant progress towards achieving Tier One status

Tier Three, those that are not making significant efforts or progress in combatting human trafficking

If you look at the Wikipedia map of  how countries are doing according to this ranking, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trafficking_in_Persons_Report an interesting fact appears about Taiwan.  On this map, Taiwan is a bright green Tier One Country.  

Almost all of the countries nearby, are either yellow, signifying Tier Two, or a bright red, signifying Tier Three.  

What Is Taiwan Doing to Be Such a Standout?

According to Dr. Jenwha Ma, recently retired Deputy Head of Criminal Investigation Bureau, National Police Agency who currently work as Chief Security Officer in a Taiwanese enterprise, “The country has made prosecution it’s number one priority.”  

Making prosecution the number one priority has some immediate practical consequences.  The crime of trafficking too often goes unpunished because it’s often difficult to get the victims to testify.  In the absence of consequences, trafficking flourishes.

Increasing the Odds of Being Prosecuted

Taiwan has laws and systems for increasing the odds that a trafficker will pay a price.  For example:

In the past, when a trafficking victim was rescued, he or she might never testify against the trafficker. That’s because the trafficker could see to it that the victim was spirited out of the country before testifying. Today, law enforcement in Taiwan, works with the Taiwanese Immigration Department to ensure that the victim stays in the country until he or she has testified. 

Incidentally the problem just described happens in the United States, and Jeffrey Epstein is the classic example. In the case of the original prosecution of Jeffrey Epstein, one of the several reasons he got an absurdly lenient sentence was, most of the witnesses were moved overseas and were therefore unavailable to prosecutors.

Taiwan works to ensure that Epstein-type miscarriages of justice don’t happen. Keeping potential witnesses in the country is one reason prosecution of traffickers is becoming more effective. 

Another problem for law enforcement is, frequently a trafficked person may not speak the country’s language.  To counteract this, members of Taiwanese law enforcement go out of their way to ensure that interpreters are available whether the victim speaks, Japanese or Thai or Indonesian or any other language.

Still another problem with prosecuting traffickers is, where does the victim stay while waiting to testify? In the case of a prostituted girl, she may have no other marketable skills, and since she needs food and a roof over her head, she is at risk of being re-trafficked. 

Taiwan has an answer for this also. “In Taiwan,” says Dr. Ma, “we have safe housing run by the Immigration Agency. We call them ‘Protection Centers.’”

“While at the Protection Center,” continues Ma, “we look out for their welfare, and we give them occupational training.”  A stay in a Protection Center could last several months depending on the trial date and also  depending on diplomatic arrangements between Taiwan and the country they were trafficked from. 

Results

According to statistics from Taiwan’s Ministry of the Interior, the total number of human trafficking cases in 2018 was 133.  Of these, sexual exploitation accounted for 71% and labor exploitation 29%

“Each case may have more than one person involved and arrested,” points out Ma, “The total number of suspects involved in the 133 cases is 433 individuals.”  

Dr. Ma’s statistic of 433 individuals is an impressive one because these are the people doing the trafficking.  Word spreads among the traffickers that there are consequences, usually in the form of jail time.  Prosecutions mean some people are put away and therefore not continuing to abuse their victims.  For other traffickers, the reality that they may be prosecuted is a deterrent.

Cooperation between Taiwan and the US

Dr. Ma is pleased with the close cooperation between the  US and Taiwan law enforcement agencies in fighting against international sexual and labor exploitation. The two countries cooperate on exchanging information. 

He wishes, however, that Taiwan could be a member of Interpol. Interpol is currently unavailable to Taiwan since the United Nations doesn’t recognize Taiwan as a nation separate from China. “This is a big problem,” explains Ma, “since it keeps us from cooperating with many countries. It means we are not in the ring of information, and we are late in receiving tips, whether about drugs or human trafficking.” 

He wishes this would change.

Contact us today to discover what you can do to increase human trafficking awareness.

__________________-

Mitzi Perdue is a business owner, speaker. and author of the book, 52 Tips for Combatting Human Trafficking.  Contact her at Mitzi@MitziPerdue.com or call her at 410 860-4444.